$3 Million To Help Boost Carnaby's Black Cockatoo Numbers

$3 Million To Help Boost Carnaby's Black Cockatoo Numbers

The Morrison Government is investing $3 million through its Environment Restoration Fund to help in the recovery of the iconic Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo.

Known for their distinctive white cheeks and short bills, the endangered Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is now only found in some parts of southwest Western Australia.

Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley said with the support of Birdlife Australia, five community organisations will now deliver projects to help in the raising of black cockatoo fledglings at nesting sites, in time for the main breeding season.

“Through the combined efforts of more than 80 landholders and community groups, the projects are expected to assist in 1800 extra fledglings joining the flock,” Ms Ley said.

“Private landholders will also deliver on-ground activities, including revegetating 127 hectares of land with key food plants for black cockatoos and work on improving our understanding of black cockatoo nesting locations by surveying for undiscovered sites.”

Member for Canning Andrew Hastie welcomed the announcement.

“This is a really positive development for the recovery and preservation of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos. These are local birds that are now unique to our part of the world - we want to protect them. This is what stewardship is all about and PHCC is best placed to help make that happen here in the Peel Region.

“Projects funded through the Morrison Government’s $100 million Environment Restoration Fund aim to protect threatened species by delivering practical action on the ground.”

PHCC Chairman Caroline Knight welcomed the announcement, saying “PHCC is happy this landscape scale project recognises the plight of the Black Cockatoos and we look forward to working on the ground with our landholders to reduce the threats which affect these iconic species.”

The five successful Community Organisations are:

  • Peel-Harvey Catchment Council
  • Wheatbelt NRM
  • South West Catchments Council
  • South Coast NRM and
  • Northern Agricultural Catchment Council